In an emergency always call 999

High Peak Youth Engagement Team share stranger danger tips to keep your children safe over the summer holidays

Posted on 17th July 2018

Officers from the High Peak Youth Engagement Team want to share their stranger danger tips with parents ahead of the school summer holidays.

It’s as they expect many youngsters to be enjoying local parks and the outdoors during the fine weather.

PCSO Lee Baker said: “We just would like parents to make sure their children have common sense and are aware of their safety while out and about, which they probably will be during the long summer holidays.

“While we can’t wrap our youngsters up in cotton wool, we can encourage them to be alert and as safe as possible when away from home, and for them to enjoy the break from school.”

Our top tips you can share with your family about stranger danger: 

  1. Who is a stranger? A stranger is quite simply someone you don’t know, and it’s difficult to know if they are nice and safe or not as they’re not likely to look like they are portrayed in cartoons and films.
  2. Say no. Encourage your children to follow the golden rules- never go anywhere with a stranger, never take things from a stranger, never get in a car with a stranger and never go off on your own. If a stranger asks you to do any of these things then you must tell an adult you trust, such as a police officer, your parents or relations or a teacher.
  3. Plan ahead- do your children have the contact numbers for your home, work and mobile? Share them so that they can reach you if they are on their own or waiting for you. Agree a plan they will stick to should you be late to collect them.
  4. Practice saying no- Help your children to have the confidence to say no by practicing scenarios and talking through ‘what if’s’.
  5. If you have teenaged children, make sure you know where they will be and what time they will be home.
  6. Talk to your children about their time out, and try and find out a little about any new names they mention, including who they are, how old they are, how they met and what they do.

PCSO Baker added: “We don’t want to worry parents; we just want to share our advice for a safe summer, so please help us by passing on our advice to your children.”

If you have any concerns or issues relating to strangers approaching children you can get in touch by using one of the following non-emergency contact methods.

Please note in the event of an emergency, or if a crime is in progress, you should always call 999.

Do you need a quick answer to a general question? Then we recommend you visit the national Ask The Police web site.